Despite it being one of my primary occupations, and therefore something you’d expect me to have answered by know, I have realised this blog hasn’t yet provided a satisfactory reason for the existence of a large proportion of its content. To some, welfare charities and the like exist for lonely people to include in their will, or as a distraction from more pressing international problems. After all, they’re only animals, right?

But this question’s most critical answer lies not in the muddy waters of animal rights, but on the dry and familiar land of basic human interest. Animal Welfare is important,  not only because we owe the beings that we depend upon respect and protection, but because caring for animals is good for human nature. Fostering concern for the welfare of another being, be it animal or human, is crucially important for the development of individual humans and the human race as a whole. 

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Author Update

15/12/11

Firstly, I’d like to apologise for the lack of recent activity, and thank those who contributed to the AT’s Assistance Dog Week at the start of the year. There were some really engaging guest posts to read and due to it’s success, AT plans to host more themed weeks in the future.

Soon I will be graduating from the Animal Behaviour and Welfare degree at the University of Bristol, which has occupied much of my time in the past couple of months!

At the moment I am working on a Poultry Welfare project in Oslo, funded by the UFAW Vacation Studentship grant. The project aims to investigate the welfare of hens reared in aviaries that then go on to produce in the more restrictive ‘furnished cages’.

Watch this space for a resurgence of AT posts (some of which will feature more feathers than fur) in the coming weeks!

Picture by Martin de Witte

Most of us know not leave our dogs in cars, so we open the window a tad, or won’t be away long. Here’s why we shouldn’t take the risk, even if its just for a little while.